Unpublished Lost Angels interview

Before I move on from all the Lost Angels/Angelus Rose posts, I want to post an interview that I did for someone else’s blog quite a while ago. It was never published, so I thought I’d put it up here. It was originally written in 2016, after Lost Angels came out, but I’ve updated it a little to be useful now.

If there was a film or TV adaptation of your book, who would you like to see play your characters?

When Brian and I first started writing Lost Angels, I had Angelina Jolie in mind for Lorelei. This was not long after the movie Hackers came out, when Angelina was young and liable to say or do anything. Charlize Theron was who I imagined as her blond sister Floria. The angel Azaziel has always been harder to cast, but I feel like Matt Ryan, who’s played John Constantine on TV, would be perfect.

How important are character names to you in your books? Is there a special meaning to any of the names?

Well, Lorelei’s name is closer to mine than is comfortable, but she was named for an apartment building down the street from my cowriter Brian’s home at the time. I didn’t know anything about Azaziel when Brian named him, but he turned out to have a great backstory — thanks to Lord Byron — about falling in love with a girl named Anah before the Flood. That gave us a lot to play with in our books.

Give us an insight into your main character. What makes her unique?

Lorelei is considered young for a succubus, even though she’s hundreds of years old. She’s worked her way up from imp and is aiming to be promoted to temptress, so she’s ambitious and takes risks.

She’s convinced that she has the best job in Creation, luring mortals to damnation. She doesn’t see any distinction between who she is and what she does, which of course changes over the course of her books.

What do you think of book trailers?

I love book trailers. I’ve been teaching myself to make them. This is the second one for this book, since it was published previously by Black Bed Sheet Books. I like this book cover image much better.

Do you have any unique or quirky writing habits?

I like to write in cafes. I used to go out every morning, after I dropped my daughter off at school, to sit down with a composition book for an hour or so over a cafe au lait. I like collecting my thoughts longhand, then editing them as I type them in later. I really prefer writing that way, as opposed to typing directly into the computer, because slowing down to hand write everything gives me more time to think. It was strange to see all the research that came out backing me up on that.

In fact, I’ve been slowly working on a book about writing in cafes. I hope to have it out by the end of this year or early next year.

You can learn more about our succubus/angel love story here: https://lorenrhoads.com/writing/as-above-so-below/

If you’d like to order the “boxed” set of paperbacks from me, I’ll throw in a little gift. You can check Lost Angels & Angelus Rose out at my bookstore. They’re also available individually on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Bookshop.org, or as ebooks on Smashwords.

 

About Loren Rhoads

I'm the author of 199 Cemeteries to See Before You Die and Wish You Were Here: Adventures in Cemetery Travel, as well as a space opera trilogy. I'm also co-author of a series about a succubus and her angel. In addition to blogging at CemeteryTravel.com, I blog about my morbid life at lorenrhoads.com.
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2 Responses to Unpublished Lost Angels interview

  1. It’s a good book trailer! Interesting about writing in cafes. I don’t because the background noise gets to me. (Haha, as well as the cost!) But I do enjoy writing longhand. I get frustrated writing fiction that way because my head gets ahead of the story (can’t write fast enough), but I linger over a journal everyday . . . slow waves of ink on paper, it’s mesmerizing.

  2. Good interview! And may you return to writing in cafes again!

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